Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 2/19/2018

No matter how much experience you have as a gardener, mistakes happen to everyone. Some gardening mistakes are actually avoidable. Below, youíll find some of the most common gardening mistakes and how to stay clear of them. Next time around that you decide to plant, youíll have an even greener thumb than you did the season before. 

You Planted Too Early

When the springtime hits, itís easy to feel eager to plant and get your crops going. Planting too early without proper grow cloths or warm enough temperatures can be completely detrimental to anything that is trying to grow. 

Watering Too Much Or Two Little

There is a finite amount of water thatís required for plants to thrive. The general rule is for plants to receive about an inch of water per week. Plants that have not been watered enough will show certain signs including yellowing leaves and wilting leaves. Any fruits that are produced will be deformed. Be sure that you make up for the deficit of water during dry spells that occur by watering accordingly.   

Plants that have been overwatered can also cause yellowing leaves. You donít want your water to pool or cause puddles in the garden. If this happens, youíll need to add a bit more organic matter to the soil itself. 

Not Planting In A Bright Enough Place

Itís a basic scientific principle that plants need sunlight to grow properly. If you have planted things in the shade, they may not thrive. If you donít have a sunny spot to plant your garden, try using portable gardening containers that you can move around. Shoot for at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day for your plants.       

Not Weeding

Weeds can obviously choke your crops, sucking moisture and food away from the plants. If you donít actively work to eliminate weeds, your plants will suffer greatly. Eliminate weeds as soon as you spot them. Allowing one weed to flourish is to allow them all to take over! Mulching can be a great start in helping to keep weeds away. If any weeds are found after the mulch has been put down, be sure to move them promptly. 

Planting Too Much

If you plant too much, space can become a problem. Focus on planting what you and your family like to eat and will actually use. This problem comes down to a matter of preference and taste. You donít want to spend a ton of time gardening just to realize that  youíve completely wasted your efforts. 

Keep in mind that thereís always something new to learn when it comes to gardening. Know that no matter what level of gardener you are mistakes are inevitable but not completely unavoidable.         

Categories: Uncategorized  

Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 2/12/2018

Selling a home requires time, dedication and patience. As such, you need to be aware of the biggest dangers associated with selling a residence before you add your home to the real estate market; otherwise, you risk wasting your valuable time and resources. One of the biggest home selling dangers often remains ignored Ė self-sabotage. And if you're not careful, you may sabotage your chances of selling your residence without even realizing it's happening. So what can you do to avoid the danger of self-sabotaging your home sale? Here are three tips that home sellers can use to eliminate this risk altogether: 1. Be Realistic About the Price and Value of Your Home. Employ a professional appraiser to evaluate your home before you list it on the real estate market. By doing so, you'll be able to better understand what your home is worth and price it appropriately. Also, keep in mind that what you ask for your house may not be what homebuyers offer for your residence. For instance, in a seller's market, you might actually receive multiple offers that exceed your initial asking price. Conversely, in a buyer's market, you may wind up getting numerous offers at or below your original asking price. Regardless of whether you're selling your residence in a buyer's or seller's market, however, it is important to remain flexible. Ultimately, you need to feel comfortable with the initial asking price you set your house and the offers you receive for your residence, and only then will you be able to finalize an agreement that works well for both you and a homebuyer. 2. Act Fast on Any Offers You Receive. It is paramount to prepare for offers before they arrive, as this will enable you to act quickly and efficiently. Typically, you'll only have a short amount of time to decide whether to accept a homebuyer's proposal. And if you plan for prospective offers you'll receive, you can act confidently under duress. Consider how you'll respond if you receive an offer that meets or exceeds your initial asking price, along with how you'll respond to an offer that falls below your initial expectations. Because if you plan for the best- and worst-case scenarios, you'll be better equipped to minimize the chance of sabotaging a home sale. 3. Work with an Experienced Real Estate Agent. Collaborate with an experienced real estate agent, and you'll be able to prevent the risk of self-sabotage. A real estate agent will help you determine the best price for your home and get your residence ready for a home showing. Meanwhile, this professional likely will possess years of experience and ensure you understand the ins and outs of the real estate market, allowing you to make the best decisions possible relative to your home sale. Find the right real estate agent to sell your home Ė you'll be thrilled you did! With an expert real estate agent at your disposal, you'll be able to improve your chances of finding many interested homebuyers and getting multiple offers for your residence. Understand the danger of self-sabotage, and you can prevent this problem from arising as you attempt to sell your house.

Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 2/5/2018

This Single-Family in Chelmsford, MA recently sold for $304,000. This Ranch style home was sold by Mary-Lou McDonough - Barrett Sotheby's International Realty.

11 Miner Ave, Chelmsford, MA 01863


Sale Price

Finally you have the opportunity to buy a updated ranch with a full basement and an attached garage ! Great location too as it's the last house on a dead end street.abutting town land. Hardwood floors , New boiler ,updated granite kitchen , updated bath. newer electrical box . Full walk out basement has an attached storage shed. Great spot to relax in the summer as there is a deck off the living room overlooking a private level lot. . Limited showing access , please read showing instructions

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Categories: Sold Homes  

Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 2/5/2018

A homebuying negotiation may cause your stress levels to rise. However, as you work toward purchasing your dream house, there is no need to worry. In fact, there are many ways that you can limit stress as you finalize a home purchase, including:

1. Discuss Your Homebuying Concerns with Family Members and Friends

Family members and friends offer plenty of support. Thus, these loved ones are happy to listen to you and help you in any way possible, no matter what happens during a homebuying negotiation.

Don't be afraid to ask family members and friends for homebuying advice, either. These loved ones may be able to share their past homebuying negotiation experiences with you. And by doing so, your family members and friends could provide you with valuable insights that may help you move one step closer to acquiring your ideal residence.

2. Consider the Big Picture

Buying a home likely will be one of the biggest transactions that you'll complete in your lifetime. At the same time, it is important to note that there are plenty of fish in the sea. Therefore, you should try to remember that even if a home purchase agreement falls through, dozens of high-quality houses are still available in cities and towns nationwide.

Sometimes, it helps to take a step back during a homebuying negotiation. If you can inhale and try to relax, you may be better equipped than ever before to stay calm, cool and collected during a negotiation. With a fresh perspective, you could boost the likelihood of coming to terms with a seller and finalizing a home purchase agreement.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

When it comes to purchasing a house, there is no need to embark on the homebuying journey alone. Fortunately, if you hire a real estate agent, you can receive expert support as you navigate the homebuying journey.

A real estate agent understands the stress associated with purchasing a house and will do everything possible to help you alleviate your homebuying worries. He or she can explain the homebuying process and respond to any concerns or questions. Plus, a real estate agent can negotiate with a seller's agent on your behalf to help you get the best price on your dream residence.

Furthermore, a real estate agent provides support after a seller accepts your offer to purchase a residence. A real estate agent will help you set up a home inspection, conduct this inspection with you and ensure you can complete a full review of the inspection results. In addition, a real estate agent can help you prepare for a home closing and ensure you can finalize a home purchase as quickly as possible.

There is no need to let stress get the best of you during a homebuying negotiation. By using the aforementioned tips, you can keep your stress levels in check as you negotiate a home purchase and accelerate the process of purchasing your dream home.

Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 1/29/2018

The realization that a family dog or cat has gone missing can be a scary, if not panic-inducing moment. While some cats seem able to fend for themselves in the outside world, if they're gone for more than a day, it's only natural to assume the worst. It goes without saying that cats kept indoors stand the best chance of staying safe and living a long life. However, many cats are determined to explore the outside world regardless of your good intentions, and trying to prevent them from doing so may ultimately be an exercise in futility. To further complicate matters, many cats and dogs are quite resourceful when it comes to spotting and taking advantage of open doors and unlocked backyard gates.

Once they're outside, cats can easily jump over fences, and dogs -- especially puppies -- have a knack for finding and escaping through small openings in the fence (often at the bottom) that you may not have noticed. There are a lot of different possible causes for the disappearance of a pet, but the sense of loss families experience when a beloved pet doesn't return is universal. Since prevention only goes so far with adventurous cats and dogs, it can also be helpful to have a quick response plan ready. Making sure your pet is either micro-chipped or wearing a collar with up-to-date ID tags can increase your chances of getting a lost pet returned to you quickly.

One vital resource to be aware of and connected with is neighborhood social media sites. By finding out if there are any active ones in your area, you can be in a better position to quickly alert your neighbors, in the event your pet suddenly disappears. Since many people are pet owners, they'll be very sympathetic and responsive to an online post of a missing dog or cat. The bottom line is this: Your prospects of a speedy reunion will often improve in direct proportion to how many neighbors know about your missing animal friend and how to contact you.

There's also the relatively old-fashioned, but often effective method of printing out and posting "lost pet" flyers. In addition to posting them in various locations, such as dog parks, neighborhood stores, and pet-oriented businesses, you can also hand them out to neighbors you see when conducting your initial search. For maximum effectiveness, the flyer should say "Lost Cat" or "Lost Dog" at the top of the flyer, and include a good photo of your pet, as well as your phone number and information about when and where they were last seen. Other features, such as breed, color, markings, age, weight, gender, your pet's name, and any unique characteristics should also be included in the flyer to help neighbors identify your pet. Additional tactics and tools for recovering a lost pet are also available through the ASPCA.